Dorado Zip Code | Dorado, PR, Dorado Municipio

Dorado Zip Code, Use our postal code lookup for every country around the world. Complete list of zip codes and all administrative divisions for countries.

Zip/Postal Code00646
TypeSTANDARD
Decommissioned0
Primary CityDorado
Acceptable Cities
Unacceptable CitiesBo Arenal, Bo Saldinera, Bosque Dorado, Chalets De Dorado, Comunidad Arenales, Comunidad Arenales Ii, Hacienda Mi Querido Viejo, Jard De Dorado, Jard Dorado, Parc El Cotto, Parc Mameyal, Parc San Antonio, Paseo Del Mar, Paseo Del Sol, Paseo Las Olas, Paseo Las Palmas, Paseo Los Corales, Paseo Los Corales Ii, Paseo Real, Qtas De Dorado, Sect La Aldea, Urb Costa De Oro, Urb Dorado Country Ests, Urb Dorado Del Mar, Urb Dorado Reef, Urb Doraville, Urb Gables Breeze, Urb Golden Hls, Urb Los Montes, Urb Los Prados Norte, Urb Los Prados Sur, Urb Martorell, Urb Miraflores, Urb Monte Bello, Urb Monte Elena, Urb Monte Mayor, Urb Monte Verde, Urb Montelindo, Urb Montereal, Urb Paisajes De Dorado, Urb Palmar Dorado Norte, Urb Sabanera Dorado, Urb Santa Barbara, Urb The Clusters, Urb The Estates, Valle Dorado, Villa Plata, Villa Santa, Villa Santa Ii
StatePR
CountyDorado Municipio
TimezoneAmerica/Puerto_Rico
Area Codes787
World RegionNA
Latitude18.47
Longitude-66.27
Estimated Population 20150

How to find a Zip Code

Finding the postal codes you need for your post is as simple as few clicks. First select your country of choice to be taken to a list of the administrative divisions of that country. Then select the area where you are trying to send your letter for a list of the available zip codes for that area.

Not sure of the country or the administrative division to choose? Or your country/region is missing in the list? Try entering the address into the search at the top of the page to lookup the right code to use. Also available, try using our country map to find your needed zip/postal code.

What ZIP Codes Are and How they Work

There are three main parts of the 5-digit ZIP Code—the national area, the region or city, and the delivery area. The United States Postal Service (USPS) has segmented the country into 10 ZIP Code areas. Starting in the northeast, they are numbered 0-9.

Reading a ZIP Code

After the first number in a ZIP Code is assigned, the USPS assigns the next two numbers according to city. If a region has a main town or city, the USPS will often assign it the first ZIP Codes. After that, the ZIP Codes will proceed alphabetically.

The first three digits of a ZIP Code together usually indicate the sectional center facility to which that ZIP Code belongs. This facility is the mail sorting and distribution center for a zone or area. Some sectional center facilities have multiple three-digit codes assigned to them. For example, the Northern Virginia sectional center facility in Merrifield is assigned ZIP Codes beginning in 220, 221, 222, and 223.

The fourth and fifth digits of the ZIP Code represent the area of the city or town. For example, if a letter is received with a ZIP Code of 47722, the USPS can know that it's in Indiana (4), it's in Vanderburgh county (77), and it's in the area of the University of Evansville (22).

ZIP Codes are Lines, Not Shapes

ZIP Codes are not drawn according to state boundaries. In fact, since they are designed only to increase mailing efficiency, ZIP Codes can and do cross county and state boundaries. For example:

Although most ZIP Codes can be roughly assigned to a geographic area, ZIP Codes do not represent geographic regions; ZIP Codes denote address groups or delivery routes. Because of this, ZIP Code "areas" can overlap, be contained within another ZIP Code, or have no geographic area. For example ZIP Codes that start with 095 are assigned to the Navy, and therefore have no geographic location. Similarly, areas without regular postal routes (rural route areas) or areas with no mail delivery (undeveloped areas), are not assigned ZIP Codes. They are based on sparse delivery routes, so the boundary between ZIP Code areas there is indefinite.

You can see our instructions on how to find county by ZIP Code. In cases where ZIP Codes cross county lines, SmartyStreets displays the default county in the line labeled ‘County Name’ and include an additional line labeled as ‘Alternate Counties’.

ZIP+4 Codes

In 1983, the USPS changed its ZIP Code system to include the new ZIP+4. A ZIP+4 Code uses the basic five-digit code plus four additional digits to for a full 9 digit ZIP Code. The full ZIP Code identifies a small delivery segment such as a street, a city block, a group of apartments, or even an individual address that receives a high volume of mail. The ZIP+4 Code is not required and is usually calculated automatically when the mail is sorted and processed.

As a rule, each Post Office Box has its own ZIP+4 Code. The +4 on the ZIP Code is often the last four digits of the box number, zero plus the last three digits of the box number, or, if the box number is less than 4 digits, zeros followed by the box number. Since there is this variance, the ZIP+4 Code must be looked up individually for each Post Office Box.

Not all USPS deliverable addresses have a ZIP+4 Code assigned to them. For those addresses, geocoding lookups or address validation that require a ZIP+4 may not succeed. Even though the USPS might not provide accurate geocodes for those addresses, SmartyStreets can still provide roof-top level geocodes for most addresses in the US.

What Are Postal Codes?

Postal codes are strings of numbers (and sometimes letters) that help postal services determine where a piece of mail is being sent to. They help simplify the task of bringing post to its destination. Nations throughout the world use postal codes, and though the systems and formats vary, the common trait is that they all make the postman's job a little easier.

These codes indicate the extent of delivery jurisdictions. Every delivery point that falls under the same jurisdiction is one whole postal code, and anything beyond those dividing lines are counted as a different code. Sometimes postal codes are tied to geographical areas or administrative boundaries. Sometimes they're more free-floating. In some cases, they are attached to a specific organization, or even to a single delivery point. In all cases, they are closely tied to and heavily defined by where the postal employee goes when delivering the mail.

How Postal Codes are Developed and Used

Fair warning: we find this subject unreasonably exciting. Accordingly, we're happy to help you find your own postal code. But more than that, these codes had an immense impact on postal operations worldwide. Without them, mail would take longer to reach you. But we're getting ahead of ourselves. First, let's talk about where they came from, and then we can talk about why we have them and how they work.

The Source of the Code

In the (Postal) Zone

Back when cities started to get bigger, and reliable mail services became the standard, a problem was identified that made deliveries difficult: In a place like, say, London, there were just too many people for one postman—or even one post office—to deliver to. Like any industry, meeting demand is at least partially a problem of logistics: having the means and the manpower to fill the need. So the first and most obvious answer was to build more post offices and hire more postmen.

Once that happens, though, you start running into a problem. How do you know which houses are the ones you're supposed to take mail to? If Dr. John Watson lives halfway between post office A and post office B, which office should handle his mail? Both could do it, but that would be less efficient; it's smarter to have one postman deliver mail to the Doctor's house and everything to the right of his house, or to have the other postman handle the Doctor's house and everything to the left.

Either way, the work needs to be divided to make sure any given post office isn't doing more than their fair share of labor.

So post offices started drawing lines in the sand. The divisional boundaries they put in place were called postal districts, or sometimes postal zones. To keep track of them all, they were numbered, creating "postal district numbers" or "postal zone numbers."

These postal district numbers started in large cities, and they started a while ago (London, for instance, was divided into 10 districts as early as 1857). WWI Europe had already seen the implementation of similar systems in cities throughout the continent. The US started using them at least as early as 1920. These district numbers were the forerunners of the modern day postal codes.

Post Codes from Coast to Coast—Taking it Across the Country

The primary difference between these primitive codes and their more evolved cousins is that of coverage: postal districts only happened in the cities, and then only in some cities. They were neither pervasive nor systemic, though the idea of expanded and universal delivery codes started floating around as early as the 1930s. The first country to try and implement a system was the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic (a USSR that eventually became part of the USSR) back in December 1932.

However like everything else that invades Russia during the winter, it didn't find a warm reception. The failed attempt was discontinued in 1939.

Germany had functioning system in place in 1941 despite the war, while the US didn't put ZIP Codes into effect until 1963. Later still, the UK hadn't fully deployed a nationwide implementation until 1974. Since then, though, postal codes have been the norm, with countries expanding their formats to accommodate for additional areas. This is most frequently done by adding digits to the code, a la changing from a 3-digit code to a 5-digit one, and so on.

Today, these codes are used for a great deal. They help with geocoding, address validation, and efficient shipping, to name just a few things. They are even used as part of verifying identity and ensuring that things like credit cards aren't being stolen. So unlike what you learned in high school algebra, these are numbers worth knowing how to use.

International Post Code Names

William Shakespeare once wrote, "A postal code by any other name would smell as sweet." We may have paraphrased that just a little, but the point is, different nations have different names for the same thing. Just like the US calls it a "flashlight" and the UK calls it a "torch," so too are the names of the postal code different depending on where you are.

Different Formats of Codes

Formats for these codes vary. There are some cornerstones that can be laid, and some generalities given on the topic, however. Like how they're used heavily by the Universal Postal Union, an agency of the UN.

CityCountyZip/Postal Code
AdjuntasAdjuntas Municipio PR00601
AguadaAguada Municipio PR00602
AguadillaAguadilla Municipio PR00603
Aguadilla PR00604
Aguadilla PR00605
MaricaoMaricao Municipio PR00606
AnascoAnasco Municipio PR00610
Angeles PR00611
AreciboArecibo Municipio PR00612
Arecibo PR00613
Arecibo PR00614
BajaderoArecibo Municipio PR00616
BarcelonetaBarceloneta Municipio PR00617
BoqueronCabo Rojo Municipio PR00622
Cabo RojoCabo Rojo Municipio PR00623
PenuelasPenuelas Municipio PR00624
CamuyCamuy Municipio PR00627
CastanerLares Municipio PR00631
Rosario PR00636
Sabana GrandeSabana Grande Municipio PR00637
CialesCiales Municipio PR00638
UtuadoUtuado Municipio PR00641
DoradoDorado Municipio PR00646
EnsenadaGuanica Municipio PR00647
FloridaFlorida Municipio PR00650
GarrochalesArecibo Municipio PR00652
GuanicaGuanica Municipio PR00653
GuayanillaGuayanilla Municipio PR00656
HatilloHatillo Municipio PR00659
HormiguerosHormigueros Municipio PR00660
IsabelaIsabela Municipio PR00662
JayuyaJayuya Municipio PR00664
LajasLajas Municipio PR00667
LaresLares Municipio PR00669
Las MariasLas Marias Municipio PR00670
ManatiManati Municipio PR00674
MocaMoca Municipio PR00676
RinconRincon Municipio PR00677
QuebradillasQuebradillas Municipio PR00678
MayaguezMayaguez Municipio PR00680
Mayaguez PR00681
MayaguezMayaguez Municipio PR00682
San GermanSan German Municipio PR00683
San SebastianSan Sebastian Municipio PR00685
MorovisMorovis Municipio PR00687
Sabana HoyosArecibo Municipio PR00688
San AntonioAguadilla Municipio PR00690
Vega AltaVega Alta Municipio PR00692
Vega BajaVega Baja Municipio PR00693
Vega BajaVega Baja Municipio PR00694
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